Vistoria Seymour - Author Victoria Seymour - Author of Letters from Lavender Cottage, Letters to Hannah, Court in the Act and The Long Road to Lavender Cottage
Victoria Seymour's books
Letters from Lavender Cottage
Letters to Hannah
Court in the Act
The Long Road to Lavender Cottage
Host Families Wanted
The Slow Turning Tide
Biography of Victoria Seymour
Contact Victoria Seymour
Acknowledgements from Victoria Semour
Foyle's War
Victoria Seymour favourite links
Victoria's Message Board
Victoria Seymour press releases
Purchase books by Victoria Seymour
Radio Interview
Stories of WW2
Home page
I am sorry to say that I have had to close the Message Board/Guestbook due to constant hacking and posting of inappropriate messages by irresponsible people.

Thank you to everyone else who has posted messages over the last 11 years. If you like to contact me please send an e-mail to:  
Below you will find all the messages in simplified form

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Andrew Wright from Near Lowestoft, Suffolk wrote on October 2. 2013, 20:31:
E-mail: awrighttransport at hotmail.co.uk
--
Just wondering about a Gun Battery. My mother and her sister
served on a Battery at Hastings. My aunt married one of the
men from the Battery and I still have contact with one of my
mothers friends that also served there.
Best Wishes Andrew.


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Wendy from Canada wrote on October 2. 2013, 18:01:
E-mail: wendyjohnson at sympatico.ca
--
Victoria, you have so many recent messages on here that don't pertain to your site. Can you delete them?


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Marianne from Canada via New York! wrote on October 1. 2013, 03:50:
E-mail: mluhman at hotmail.com
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Hello Ms. Seymour,
I stumbled upon your site this evening and enjoyed browsing it. I always wanted to own a home named "Lavender Cottage" because I just love growing lavender. I envy anyone living in such a place. I, too, am a writer of sorts, only happening upon it during the last 10 years. I have written about my experiences homeschooling my two daughters here in rural British Columbia. The elder of whom has transfixed herself to Lewes in Sussex. I am feeling very connected to England lately since she has moved there. In any event, I am considering creating a website to place my writings on - what advice to you have to give?
Thank you so much for reading this.
Marianne Luhman, Castlegar, BC


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Alex Atkinson from Hastings wrote on July 22. 2013, 12:40: --
Hi Victoria. Great job that you are doing. I was fasinated by your biography, and must say how well and far you have come. i eagerly await your next book.


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Sue Adams from Kent wrote on April 3. 2013, 14:10:
E-mail: Sueatthegeorge at yahoo.co.uk
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Could you tell me of any hotels in Linton road Hastings in the 1950


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Alan Glenn from Memphis, Tennessee USA wrote on January 18. 2013, 16:58:
E-mail: judge.alan.glenn at tncourts.gov
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This is a very fascinating site, which I came upon because of my interest in Foyle's War. I hope that someday I can visit Hastings. My ancestors came from Glasgow, Scotland, which I also hope to visit again.


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Victoria Seymour from Hastings East Sussex wrote on May 13. 2011, 11:46:
E-mail: mail at victoriaseymour.com
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I am pleased you found your visit to Hastings interesting. During the raid of 23rd May a number of Canadian soldiers, billeted at the Albany hotel, were killed. You can find more details of this raid in my book Letters to Hannah. This is a compilation of WWII memories of Hastings and my own wartime childhood in Chislehurst, not far from where you live. This book is available directly from me, via my website.


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Dorothy Fuller from Orpington kent wrote on May 12. 2011, 17:28:
E-mail: dorothyj284 at hotmail.com
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Dear Victoria, thank you for your website. I have justreturned from a weeks stay at Fairlight/Guestling. I was watching the news on TV the other evening and saw the Duchess of Cornwall visiting Hastings Cemeteryand laying a wreath to servicemen of the Commonwealth. As my husband & I are both interested in WW1 & WW2 we paid a visit yesterday to the Cemetery.How interesting! I got talking to a stone mason who was working there, who lives in Hastings he was able to show me some very interesting grave stones. In particular we were interested in the story behind the graves of the civilians who died on 23 May 1943, Lo & behold your website has given us the info that I can put with the photo that I took of the graves. I thank you very much. The people that are buried in the cemetery were they all Hastings residents, or were there any guests staying at the Hotel who were killed ? Regards from Mr & Mrs Fuller


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Victoria Seymour from Hastings East Sussex wrote on January 25. 2011, 17:00:
E-mail: mail at victoriaseymour.com
--
Hello Penny, Thank you for taking the trouble to use my guest book. I am pleased you found so much you could identify with in my book Letters from Lavender Cottage and that you plan to read my other titles. If you want to broaden the story of the Ridge, its buildings, institutes and residents of the past and up to 2006, you will find my book The Long Road to Lavender Cottage useful.
Best Wishes Victoria Seymour



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Penny Hills from Bexhill on Sea/Hastings wrote on January 24. 2011, 19:13:
E-mail: chrisj.hills at virgin.net
--
Hello, I so enjoyed reading your book Letters from Lavendar
Cottage and plan to read the others too now. I know the area
well as we lived just off the Ridge in 1963 and I went to
St. Margarets School as a day pupil. 1947 was a very sad
year for our family, my Granny May died suddenly aged 43 on
6th June (a very hot day I have been told) in St. Leonards.
As I was not born until 1955 it was so interesting to get a
flavour of the world at that time. My mother never really
got over her mothers death, she was only 14 and was doing
her Matric at the High School just along the Ridge. The
three ladies also reminded me of my Granny Bee (Fathers
Mother)and her sisters who lived very similar lives of
genteel poverty on the Sussex Downs. Eating in the street
was thought improper by them too. I think the boys school
must have closed down around 1963 because my mother went to
a sale there and we ended up with some lovely pink curtains
from the Headmasters study I believe which were such good
quality they lasted us many more years. Thanks again for
such a lovely read.


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Victoria Seymour from Hastings wrote on January 19. 2011, 09:55:
E-mail: mail at victoriaseymour.com
--
Hello Chris,
Thank you for taking the trouble to write to me; comments such as yours are so encouraging. I am delighted you enjoyed Letters from Lavender Cottage and that it gave you some insight to the lives of your parents before you were born. I too enjoy the anecdotes from the Hastings and St Leonards Observer; if you read my other titles you will discover many references to local news, as well as pictures of people, places and events,
All of my books are available from my website or from Hastings Information Centre and Ore Store in Ore Village. I have a new o****t at the White Rock Stores, next to the Save the Pier Charity Shop, which also carries my books. I supply Waterstones in Priory Meadow but they are not always attentive to keeping up to date with my titles.
Again, my thanks for your kindness,
Very Best Wishes

Victoria Seymour


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Chris Giles from Hastings wrote on January 18. 2011, 21:08:
E-mail: chrisgiles46 at hotmail.com
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I loved the Letters from Lavender Cottage and will be buying more books by Victoria.... My parents lived in Hastings & St Leonards all their lives they married in 1950... I was born in 1954 also Hastings... It has given me an insight of what was happening in Hastings as they were growing up marrying me being born.. My mother and father always talked about the war..so I will be buying more of your books to find out more.... Very interesting the sippets form the Hastings & St Leonards Observer as well...


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Elizabeth Woods from CA wrote on December 31. 2010, 14:00:
E-mail: kbwoods at shaw.ca
--
We have just discovered the series Foyles War for Christmas
this year, and are enjoying it immensely. When my husband
purchased the series, he took a leap of faith, not knowing
anything about it, and we are enjoying watching the segments
very much. I now will try and find your Letters from Lavender
Cottage, and some of your other books as I'm very interested
in this period of history. Thank you.


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Wendy Johnson from Canada wrote on September 20. 2010, 03:21:
E-mail: lavendercat_408 at hotmail.com
--
Congratulations on your latest book, Victoria! I hope to get a copy when we are in London in November. So sorry I'll miss the launch of your new book. Good luck with it.


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Tony Hopkins from Diss in Norfolk formerly Beckenham Kent wrote on July 23. 2010, 17:53: --
Just looking at the latest on your site. Regards and good wishes to you.


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Virginia from Canada wrote on April 14. 2010, 21:06:
E-mail: vdodd1 at cogeco.ca
--
My Grandmother was born in Hastings, England in 1895.
Her Grandfather was named John Bull and owned a place called "the Breakers". I understand it was destroyed during WWII. Have you ever heard of this place?


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Suzannah from Margate, Kent wrote on January 26. 2010, 16:15:
E-mail: margatehistory at hotmail.co.uk
--
I am looking for old picture of the Albany Hotel as my grandmother worked at number 8 Robertson Terrace and I am hoping they may show the building.
Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated


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Victoria Seymour from Hastings wrote on November 6. 2009, 11:46:
E-mail: mail at victoriaseymour.com
--
Dear Rica, Thank you for your very interesting guest book entry and kind words about my site. I know Geoff and admire his work; I have seen his performances many times. You write very well and I would like to invite you to contribute some recollections to my next book. Under the working title Victory ~ Hastings 1945 I am documenting memories from that year. I am asking people to recount their memories of the months leading up to victory, the celebrations and the following period. Also, I would like to know if people feel that being a wartime child affected the rest of their lives.


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rica hare from Hastings wrote on November 5. 2009, 19:19:
E-mail: rica at btinternet.com
--
I think you have an extremely good website. I came to you via Geoff Hutchinson info. (I admire him greatly - he used to work with one of my daughters). Have very vivid memories of the War, not fear, though there was a great deal of danger, but in fact, freedom. Walking to school from 5 years old, free to roam everywhere, St. Helen's Woods, Alexandra Park, parts of West Hill. Oddly, I felt much safer then - the dangers were more focused. I was in the hospital in late l940's having my tonsils out, and we had to get out of our iron cots, and hide underneath during an air raid. I remember the blackness and the brilliant flashing lights and the noise. If you heard the siren when going and coming from school, you knocked on the nearest door for shelter. A little while after the Old Town air raid in the latter part of the War, Mum took me down there, and I remember particularly the utter piles of devastion - there was a sale of furniture items, and she bought a wooden bureau for my uncle, and she said I could have something. I still have the little stool I chose.


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Tim White from Hastings wrote on October 31. 2009, 18:20:
E-mail: tim at battle-abbey.co.uk
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Hi Victoria,
Glad to see you are still busy, just thought I would let you know that I have not forgot you - I saw your books the other day the Westfield history day. I have completely re-built the Battle Abbey and Irish Guards websites. Perhaps you would take a look and let me know what you think. I am sure my dad would be happy with the way they have turned out.
All the best
Tim


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Bill Marcus from Wilmington,Delaware USA wrote on October 1. 2009, 20:39:
E-mail: bill at marcushomes.com
--
I was searching websites for a company that might be interested in an idea I have for a story. My search led to Greenlit Production,to Foyle's War,(My wife and I are watching it for the second time)to ww2 history,to Hastings,to your website. I'm so glad I persevered! Thank-you for recording so much interesting history. Sincerely Bill Marcus


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David from Resident in Australia Born in Hastings wrote on September 27. 2009, 03:39:
E-mail: djbz at bigpond.com
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Hastings my 1st home.
Laton House School; Bert Bumstead, the fishmonger in Beaconsfield Rd.; Gillis, the grocer in Hughendon
Pl.; The Chemist in Mt Pleasant with coloured bottles in the window; and my favorite crusty bread from
the bakers in Hughendon Rd next to the alley to the 'Top Shops'


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Tony Hopkins from Diss Norfolk wrote on September 1. 2009, 16:48: --
Just to say exactly 70 years ago today on 1/09/39 that father mother myself (5) sister (2) evacuated from Beckenham to Winchelsea (The Armoury) there was a clear moon as we drove down that evening in our grey Morris 10 car. The second world war was declared on Sunday 3/09/39 at 11am. I am now 75.


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Merrita Moret from New Orleans, LA USA wrote on August 10. 2009, 19:16:
E-mail: moretno at yahoo.com
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Your site is great. I am delighted that Foyle's War is returning. This series is the best I have viewed in a very long time. First class, top knotch. I purchased all the DVDs. Perhaps one day I'll get a chance to visit England. Regards,


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Wendy Johnson from Canada wrote on August 10. 2009, 00:46:
E-mail: lavendercat_408 at hotmail.com
--
I love the fact that you've used some of Emilie's handwriting on the cover of the new book! That is a great idea. Good luck with this one too! Wendy


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Tony Hopkins from Norfolk wrote on July 31. 2009, 16:31: --
Only one message since I last looked in April. I expect there are more Victoria Seymour people around the world. See if any of them come upon your site and let you know. Ages since I last visited the south coast. Happy memories of Cooden 1939 Hastings 1944 Bexhill 1947/8/9 for annual holidays. I am 75 in a fortnight. The coast I visit nowadays regularly on my free bus pass is Cromer and Sheringham. The main difference is they face north but still catch all the sun. The fresh fish is as good as ever.


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victoria seymour from hertfordshire wrote on July 1. 2009, 21:23:
E-mail: v.seymour at pcmore.co.uk
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dear victoria,
i haven't read your books, but i just thought i'd let you know we share the same name.
victoria seymour


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Tony Hopkins from Diss Norfolk wrote on April 16. 2009, 15:53: --
Just revisiting your site and reading what others have contributed.


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Glenda Griffin from Canada wrote on January 30. 2009, 20:00:
E-mail: greegriffin at yahoo.ca
--
Hi Victoria....Just stumbled on this site as I looked for info on Foyles War...my father came to Canada from Hastings as a boy of 10 in 1912...one of the home boys...he never forgot his English roots and my brothers and I grew up listening to his stories based on his few young years in England...when I read some of the messages talking about different streets, churches etc in Hastings I was reminded of some of the places my father had spoken of...All Saints Church, Edmond Road, the East Hill , and of course 1066.
I did manage to visit Hastings in the 1980s and loved the seaside charm it offered...when I happened upon the Foyles War episodes I was hooked...Hastings has always held a special place in my heart for obvious reasons....
glenda


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Wendy Johnson from Canada wrote on October 15. 2008, 19:52:
E-mail: lavendercat_408 at hotmail.com
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Congratulations on your latest book, Victoria! I've ordered a copy and will look forward to reading it. I hope it does well. Thanks so much. Wendy


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Tony Hopkins from Diss Norfolk wrote on October 9. 2008, 16:36: --
Just revisiting your website which is full of interest. When I was at Winchelsea in the autumn of 1939 as a five year old staying at The Armoury the Arthur and Hilda Coldman home, he was a builder in Dulwich and Beckenham, there was a shop Barlings which sold cakes and I remember particularly hundreds of wasps and bees buzzing up and down in the window fortunately neither I my mother or two year old sister got stung mum kept going to 95 in 1998 and of course myself and sister are now in our seventies.


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roseanne willmore from united States wrote on July 23. 2008, 00:52:
E-mail: busydancer2 at yahoo.com
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I admire the resilience of the English people of the war years and am enjoying Foyle's series. I would love to read Foyle's "memoirs." I find the spirit very inspiring.


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Pat Drew from Canada wrote on July 12. 2008, 18:09:
E-mail: patdrew at rogers.com
--
Dear Victoria,
I have just finished reading your book "Letters from Lavender Cottage" which was lent to me by Wendy Johnson. Wendy has told us all (her exercise friends) so much about you and I was really excited that I could read your book. I found it delightful and more than interesting. I was 13 when the war began, and although I was actually born in the U.K. I was raised in Jamaica until I came to Canada 35 years ago. My dad, who had studied medicine in Aberdeen, also worked at Charing Cross Hospital/London, and on Harley Street before going to Jamaica. He loved England and bought our first ever radio in 1939 so that we all gather around in the evening and listen to "BBC Calling". I felt quite privileged to get a true insight into England during the war and thank you for that. Sincerely Pat Drew


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R. SUMLIN from NAPLES, FL, USA wrote on April 1. 2008, 17:35:
E-mail: rebeccac at jwsassociates.com
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WHAT ARE THE RECTANGULAR BOXES THAT PEOPLE IN 'FOYLE'S WAR' ARE WEARING SLUNG OVER THEIR SHOULDERS?


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Paul Norcock from Hastings wrote on March 16. 2008, 20:35:
E-mail: paulnorcock at beeb.net
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Dear Victoria,
I am a Primary School teacher in St Leonards. My class are currently learning about WW2, and I came across your very useful website as I was wanting to teach the children about the impact of the war on our local area. I am writing to ask your permission to copy and use your fascinating text on attacks on Hastings as a part of a literacy lesson. I was hoping to be able to get the children to read and make notes on sections of it, and then present it to the class. I'd be very glad to hear from you.
Yours sincerely,
Paul Norcock
St Leonards CEP School


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Joan Moules from Selsey, West Sussex now wrote on January 27. 2008, 23:56: --
An interesting site. I was born in Hastings and have many photos of what it was like in the 30s when | was growing up. I went to Holy Trinity School. Mr Ramsey was the headmaster when I was there and Miss Willowby took the infants class. My website is www.joanmoules.co.uk


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diane wheeler from wolverhampton wrote on January 10. 2008, 14:18:
E-mail: dianewheeler1 at blueyonder.co.uk
--
What a wonderful programm, i always look forward to the series. Please keep them coming

mrs d wheeler


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Karla Simpson from Columbus, Ohio, USA wrote on November 16. 2007, 10:03:
E-mail: kbbear at sbcglobal.net
--
My husband grew up in Bexhill and we have visited the area surrounding Hastings several times over the past few years, the last of which being May '07 when we got married at Battle Abbey School and spent our honeymoon in Hastings! I initially found out about your books on Ivor's Battle website and finally bought "Letters to Hannah" when we were there in May. I read the entire book during my flight back to the U.S. I am now intrigued and must read the others. The history of that area (1066, WWII, etc) fascinates me. Thank you for bringing it to life!


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teresa briffitt from hastings /robertsbridge wrote on October 23. 2007, 22:20:
E-mail: teresa at lbriffit.plus.com
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im looking into my family tree, and a man by the name of thomas winborn who married my great grandmother died in the boming at the swan inn old town, it was very interesting to see the pictures


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Tony Crittenden from Horsham,West Sussex wrote on July 3. 2007, 10:38:
E-mail: tonylesley181 at btinternet.com
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Brother of Rosemary Crittenden who is listed in the acknowledgements page of The Long Road to Lavender Cottage.
The Crittenden family lived at 19 Offa Road until 1950 when we moved to 156 Victoria Avenue. ( Corner house - since demolished but which can be see on map page 185 )
Born 1940 in what was later called St.Helen's Hospital. Attended St.Mary Star of the Sea School in High Street before moving on to the Hastings Grammar School from 1951 - 1957.
Living so close to Coghurst Gates we had the freedom of the countryside beyond and over to Fairlight - happy days indeed !
I am still a regular visitor to Hastings to visit family ( Mum still going strong at 93 years ) and to enjoy Hastings and the Countryside.


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mr peter thompson from bridlinton, east yorkshire, england. wrote on June 17. 2007, 21:19:
E-mail: peterthompson86 at btinternet.com
--
hi victoria
I am a writer like you. Love your books and the tv series, folks war. I have thought of self publishing, but the cost is perhaps beyond me. I am a pemsioner and have now to make my pennies count. I write Science Fiction and fantasy.
I find your web site facinating and very informative.
yours sincerly
peter thonpson


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Kevin Boorman from Hastings! wrote on May 30. 2007, 16:04:
E-mail: kboorman at hastings.gov.uk
--
Hi, Victoria, can you give me a ring on Hastings 451123 when convenient, please, to talk about yopu possibly doing a talk in Hastings Week on the Town Hall/Police station...
Thanks,
Kevin


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Donna Zandee from Calgary, Alberta, Canada wrote on March 29. 2007, 16:12:
E-mail: donnazandee at hotmail.com
--
Born and raised in Montreal to WWII veterans, I have been researching a paternal uncle who passed away May 23rd, 1943 during the air raids that day. Harold Austin Evans was only 29 years of age and one of 4 sons serving in the war. I am eagerly reading through this entire website - thank yu so much Victoria for your work. It's comforting and disturbing to read at times, realizing that Uncle Harold would have been enjoying a short leave, only to have it cut tragically sort by the bombings that day.


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Elisabeth Sharp from Kent wrote on March 23. 2007, 20:39:
E-mail: em.sharp at ntlworld.com
--
I purchased a copy of Letters from Lavender Cottage recently at the Hastings Museum. It was so enthralling I couldn't put it down! I was born in January 1947, and remember rationing in my childhood, but I had no idea how much hardship there was for many years after the war ended. We had a relative who lived in Barbados who used to send food parcels with things like brown sugar and candied fruits which none of our neighbours had, but I suppose we were lucky.
Letters from Lavender Cottage has helped me to fill in large gaps in my memory and has moved me more than I can say. Thank you so much for such a wonderful book.


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Ian Buist from Australia wrote on February 18. 2007, 11:34:
E-mail: ianbuist at tpg.com.au
--
Congrats on your tv series shown in Australia makes my wife and I feel like we are back in the UK left around 1982 to live in Australia from the IOW.
Great series great stories and great actors playing all the parts.....love every show on the ABC here in Melbourne (shown on our ABC on Sunday Night)
Question the town of Hastings as shown where is the actual location....would end a big debate this end.
All the best to you and all the actors
Yous Ian Buist


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Tony Hopkins from Diss Norfolk wrote on February 16. 2007, 15:57: --
Following my earlier message last year my parents and sister spent our main summer holiday at Bexhill in 1947 1948 and 1949 staying in Linden Road so we continued to visit Hastings. In August 1948 we went from the pier on Campbells paddle steamer out and round the Royal Sovereign lightship and back. This time on I cannot remember for sure whether it was clockwise or anticlockwise when we got there. The crew were pleased to see everyone and waved. We went to the White Rock Pavilion theatre to see the current show and Arthur Askey had been the highlight for my parents in the 1930s before the war. From 1st September to December 1939 we stayed in Winchelsea. In the 1960s as a Kent bellringer I visited and rang the bells in the old town and up at Christ Church Blackland. On my late mother's side a cousin Dora White who died in 2003 aged about 90 lived in Croft Road. With the coming of the internet it is interesting to keep up to date with present day Hastings as indeed all over the world from a computer terminal in the main library at Norwich. Best wishes to you and all your readers.


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David Williamson from Port Macquarie NSW Australia wrote on February 12. 2007, 02:12:
E-mail: dwilli at tsn.cc
--
Thoroughly enjoy the series ,Thank you.
Have just viewed the episode about anthrax testing in which Streptomycin was portrayed as a treatment.
Slipup??
Surely this antibiotic was first synthesized in late 1943 and was only available after the war.


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Vicki Mock from Stouffville, Ontario, Canada wrote on January 23. 2007, 04:08:
E-mail: Vick.mock at rogers.com
--
Hello! My grandmother was killed in the bombing raid of May 23, 1943. Her name was Charlotte (Lottie) Ellis Perks.
There is a church in Hastings that has pictures in their stain glass windows of the citizens who died in the bombings of Hastings. I'm trying to locate that church. I am coming to Hastings in May and really would like to view these windows.
Also my mothers names was Rosina May Perks Roth, if there
is anyone who knew her, I would love to speak to you.
Thank you all for your help.


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milton baldwin from hastings wrote on January 6. 2007, 13:20:
E-mail: miltonbaldwin at Ticali.co.uk
--
hi could you tell me more about hastings in 1943 as it is a scholl project
thankyou
Milton


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Tracy DeGrange from Kent wrote on November 19. 2006, 22:13:
E-mail: tracydegrange at yahoo.co.uk
--
I found your website very interesting. I have been finding out a bit more about my family history and learnt that my Great-grandmother Milly Rummery died during WW2 raids and her name is apparantly on the WW2 Memorial. Her daughter was called Phyllis Amelia Rummery. I would be interested to hear from anyone who knows of them.Thank you.


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Tony Hopkins from Diss Norfolk wrote on October 10. 2006, 16:38:
E-mail: me at yahoo.co.uk
--
I stayed in Hastings from 09/09/44 to 16/09/44 at old ma gurneys a short walk from the railway station my first view of the sea since 1939 at Cooden. The blast wall was still up and during that week bottle alley was reopened as that part of the beach had been demined. I was 10 years of age that year and am now 72. On the menu one evening was soused mackerel. When I was a babe my parents had stayed with a Miss Begby in Hastings and when we called one afternoon unannounced she almost fainted on the doorstep as me and my sister had grown somewhat. As we were late back to ma gurneys for evening meal my father had to put a donation in her mission tin much to the amusement of the other diners staying there. In those days we lived at Beckenham and just managed to survive the V1s and V2s with some very near misses.


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Richard Holden from Liverpool / London moving to Hastings wrote on July 17. 2006, 19:07:
E-mail: richardholden at yahoo.com
--
A wonderful site packed full of lots of interesting information.
Thanks for the experience.


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Reg Sumpster from The Ridge Stores wrote on May 6. 2006, 23:55:
E-mail: Sumpster at btinternet.com
--
I was asked some time ago if you could be given my whereabouts and that, if so, perhaps I could furnish some information towards your book, then being written. Somehow that didn't happen and I understand from Richard Knowles that your book has now been published. living at the Ridge Stores and much involved with the church in 1939 and beyond, I have many memories of the ridge (some now dim but capable of renewal probably) and would love to share them with you. But firstly I would like to read what you have put on record and, to that end, would like to read your recent book. Will you please let me know how I go about purchasing the book. Best wishes. Reg Sumpster.


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Shirley H. Brouwer from Watford Ontario Canada wrote on April 12. 2006, 22:29:
E-mail: juragirl at brktel.on.ca
--
Dear Victoria.......have just been in contact Wendy about the new book launch and viewed the pictures of the two of you at the church. Sounds as if you had a marvellous time. Good luck with this book. I have a copy of Lavender Cottage which Wendy so graciously gave me and totally enjoyed it. I had met Wendy's aunt on a number of occasions when Wendy, her mother and I visited there. Wendy and I have been friends for more than fifty years, having gone to public school and high school together. We meet each year in June at the Elmhurst Inn at Ingersoll which is midway between our homes and about an hour and half or so drive for each of us. We spent the day eating too much and catching up on the previous year. It is a date we both look forward too. Will close for now......my best shirley


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Geoff Hume from Battle Writers Group wrote on April 4. 2006, 20:33:
E-mail: humejes at aol.com
--
Dear Victoria
On behalf of our group I would once again thank you for your talk today and the great insight into your writing.
We wish you well for the future and will look forward to reading more of your work and memories
Thanks again
Geoff


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john russell from thedford ontario canada wrote on February 25. 2006, 15:07:
E-mail: jrussell at xcelco.on.ca
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good luck on your new book the long road to lavender cottage. for those who are going to the book launch there will be a huge surprise! it will not be me!
john (wendy johnson's brother)


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Cheryl Jane Bean from USA wrote on October 7. 2005, 17:08:
E-mail: txmultimedia at cyberscope.net
--
Hurricane Rita disrupted my electrical service for 12 days and I missed two episodes of Foyles War. The last show I saw - the son left for a new posting. What happened after that?


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Bob Berry from United Kingdom wrote on August 23. 2005, 19:41:
E-mail: bob.bees at tiscali.co.uk
--
Hi. Just found your website through reading The Valley News ISSUE 5 which landed on my doormat earlier this evening and is all about the Ore Valley very near to where I live. Enjoyed your site so much that I have just ordered all three of your books and look foreward to reading them. many thanks -Bob-


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Jonathan James Milne from United Kingdom wrote on May 13. 2005, 14:21: --
Hi Victoria, it was lovely to meet you yesturday. I was amazed and very grateful to realise the extent of you hard work and research into the life of my intriging ancestor. I only wish I could help or contribute more. I will try to scan a copy of the photo of Robert jnr. very soon. I have discovered free internet use in my local library! regards Jonathan.


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carole foster from England wrote on April 2. 2005, 12:23:
E-mail: carole1fred1 at aol.com
--
we have family abroad in australia who have told me about you to look out for your book she is also interested i need to get the book can it be got anywhere particular wait for your reply


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Shelagh K Greville from Canada wrote on March 5. 2005, 23:44:
E-mail: jbandskg at telus.net
--
Hello Victoria,
My husband and I are enjoying "Foyles War" very much and look foward to more of the same as we grew up in Hastings in the 40's and 50's so a lot of the places in the series are very fmailiar to us.
I was born at #1 Bohemia Road. My maternal grandparents (surname Gallop) have lived there for many generations. They were an Old Town Hastonian fishing family who lived in Bourne Walk, All Saints Street and Croft Road.
My sister and I went to school at the Sacred Heart Convent. During the later part of 1940's we lived in Cobourg Place not very far from Foyles home in Croft Road and St. Clements Church. In fact I believe I went to school with the girl who lived in Foyles home!
Most years we return to Hastings as we have Aunts and many friends still living there that we like to visit.
My husband and I were also members of the Hastings & St. Leonards Amateur Swimming Club during the 40's and 50's. There is still a number of older members like us who meet up fom time to time so we try an attend thode gatherings.


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Diana Woolston from United Kingdom wrote on November 17. 2004, 07:35:
E-mail: dianawoolston at yahoo.co.uk
--
Hi Victoria, I have recently had the pleasure of meeting Wendy Johnson and her daughter, Heather at the home of Rosemary and Ewart Crane! I believe Wendy and I are fourth cousins. I have a copy of Lavender Cottage, most enjoyable. I remember Great, great Aunt Emilie and she visited our home in West Wickham, Kent, this was probably at the end of her life. I do have vague recollections that I was told she was in the Suffragette movement. Have you heard anything about that. I also have my Grandmother's autograph book (Ellen Louise Olivia Crane 1889-1961). In it Emilie Crane drew a picture and wrote a poem. I must send you a copy of this. I will keep in touch. Best regards, Diana Woolston


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Pauline Shacklady from Canada wrote on November 16. 2004, 04:22:
E-mail: paula204 at shaw.ca
--
Dear Victoria
I can't tell you how much I enjoyed "Letters From Lavender Cottage", it brought back many memories of my stay in England immediately after the war. I was a Canadian war bride, having met my husband to be in 1942 when he was stationed near Winnipeg (my home) along with thousands of other British men who were part of the British Commonwealth Air Training Command. I have always considered myself very fortunate to have experienced life in post war Britain and believe it to have enriched my life. Thanks for the memory
Sincerely, P. Shacklady


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Anne from England wrote on October 29. 2004, 06:30:
E-mail: anniew at shaddow42.fsnet.co.uk
--
Found your site when searching for Foyles War, very interesting, keep up the good work!


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John D Clare from England wrote on October 4. 2004, 14:48:
E-mail: johndclare at aol.com
URL: http://www.johndclare.net/
--
www.johndclare.net is a Modern World History information and revision site for GCSE students.
I am a schoolteacher in the north of England and I provide it absolutely free and at my own time and expense for my students, and for anyone else who wants to use it. About 2,000 pupils a day log on.
I had two very useful links to your pages at:
http://victoriaseymour.com/ww2/noelcare/foodrationing.html
and
http://victoriaseymour.com/ww2/noelcare/shortagesandrationing.html
which seem to have disappeared???
Have you just moved them, or deleted them?
They were really useful for my students, because there are precious few personal memories about rationing.
It would be lovely if we could find some way to restore them.
Thanks
John D Clare


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Howard Seymour from England wrote on September 24. 2004, 08:57:
E-mail: hjseymour at hotmail.com
--
Hi
just to say what a wonderful site i have enjoyed reading and spending every second on here with love and much respect H j sEYMOUR......


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James Stewart from Canada wrote on August 21. 2004, 05:54:
E-mail: stewart26 at shaw.ca
--
My mother lived in Hastings on Croft Road during the war where Foyles War was filmed.She was brought up by an uncle whos last name was Farrant. He was a prominant men in Hastings,and a lawyer.
I was born in Toronto Canada and went to London to live and work. I drove south to visit Hastings and see where my mother had lived. I tried to get information on my uncle and found the name Ransom was very common in Hastings. During the war my mother was a nursing assistant in Eastborne and there met my father who was in the air force and a patient in the hospital. I again visited Hastings 4 years ago when visiting an aunt in Eastborne, it has greatly changed over the years. Although not born there I feel an attachment to Hastings. I now live in Canada in Victoria British Columbia. It is considered very English.
James Stewart


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Jan Sharp from New Zealand wrote on August 19. 2004, 01:27:
E-mail: jangees at xtra.co.nz
--
Dear Victoria,
Ted and I lived in St Leonards for 6 months last year,while there I borrowed you boook from the Hastings library,and loved it.We did not get up to the ridge but will do so next year when we return back to Hastings for Jack in the green, while there I will purchase your books, but I did write to Salmons book shop from NZ and they did not have it, nor did our library here in Christchurch, keep up the good work, carn't wait to read your next one all the best
Jan Sarp


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Jim Stampher from USA wrote on July 20. 2004, 07:29:
E-mail: stampher at innernet.net
--
Enjoyed your site tremendously. Many years ago, early 50s actually I visited Hastings on three occasions. Enjoyed the GI pub and another pub I believed called the constitution. Enjoyed the the dances on the Pier also, believe they were on Saturday nights, slthough one Saturday night I was asked to leave. I believe the man said I was jiving.
Also, watched the first episodes of Foyles War last year on Public Television. They showed each episode of the first series. This last Sunday night watched the first in series II, also enjoyed it. Enjoyed the time spent in Hastings and the many nice people I met there.


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Margaret Wilson from Australia wrote on June 30. 2004, 04:15:
E-mail: rogmagwilson at optusnet.com.au
--
Hello Victoria, I did send you some recollections as told by my 86 yr old mother. I don't know if you received them or not as my computer crashed shortly after, & it was some time before I was able to replace it, plus a new email name.I was born & bred in Hastings in 1941, lived in Battle rd, we had all our windows blown out, by a bomb exploding up the road.I still remember food rationing, choc powder given to us in tins from the Canadians at primary school.I will contact my sister in UK & see if she will purchase your books. I don't like giving bank details over the internet.
I hope they sell well for you, I will enjoy reading them it will bring back a lot of memories for my mother & I.


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Trish Cronin from Australia wrote on June 19. 2004, 00:49:
E-mail: brutish at ozemail.com.au
--
Dear Victoria,
have just purchased LFLC,which from Australia was a bit tricky but perseverance won out & I now have it & have read it all in one day. Can't wait to order Letters to Hannah. It brought back so many memories as I was born in England during the war. Good luck with your work on Foyles War, can't wait for the next series.
Would love to see LFLC made into a series, that's a thought!!
love Trish


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Gary and Sue from United Kingdom wrote on May 31. 2004, 02:31:
E-mail: gazkeys at Yahoo.co.uk
--
Hi, Just found your web site and we are most fascinated ,gary and Sue victoria Avenue hastings.


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Victoria Seymour from England wrote on April 25. 2004, 23:55:
E-mail: mail at victoriaseymour.com
--
Thank you Sally for your encouraging comments. I am now working on my third book, Court in the Act, to be published in October 2004. This is its executive summary:
Court in the Act, concentrates on the work of the police force, the magistrates? and other courts in WWII Hastings. As the effects of war took hold, there was hardly any aspect of home front life that was not controlled by some Government Act, Regulation or Order, putting even more pressure on the already beleaguered police officers.
During the war, there passed before the courts a parade of ?spies?, aliens, pacifists, looters, wartime racketeers and small-time criminals. Added to these were thousands of usually law-abiding people who found themselves in court for flouting often not properly understood laws. Sentences were handed down that sounded like something out of early Victorian history: A fine for stealing one onion from an allotment, a few apples from a tree or vegetable peelings from a dustbin, a month in prison for allowing light to escape from behind a curtain.
Meanwhile, the formidable Government Enforcers stalked the land incognito, seeking to trap unwary traders and citizens and bring them to justice. Police Court reports from the period 1939 to 1945 give an insight into a little discussed aspect of WWII. The Hastings and St Leonards Observer wartime column writer, ?Vigilant?, provides a background, with his personal comments on the foibles and morals of his home town.





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sally coussens from England wrote on April 24. 2004, 13:19:
E-mail: sally at cousens109.fsnet.co.uk
--
Hi Victoria
My name is Sally and I live in Hastings, home of Lavender Cottage. Just to let you know that I have started reading your book and am thoroughly enjoying it! Emilie looks and reminds me very much of my lovely godmother 'Auntie Joan' who is now aged 82 years, her personality is quite similiar too and she use to enjoy letter writing before her arthritis set in. I remember my father (born 1924) saying that the family would shelter in the caves on the West Hill during the bombing raids. I am a great fan of local history and genealogy. Will e-mail you again when I have finished the book. Ta Ta for Now! Sallyxx


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Wendy Johnson from Canada wrote on March 31. 2004, 07:48:
E-mail: lavendercat_408 at hotmail.com
--
Having just read Neal's message reminded me of something I read in This England magazine. On page 54 is an article about the ATS. Someone called Beryl Furey-King has a website:
www.ATSremembered.pwp.blueyonder.co.uk
which features memoirs etc. She is looking for former members to add their memories. Her email address is:
furey-king@blueyonder.co.uk
Wendy


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NEAL FOWLER from Scotland wrote on March 30. 2004, 11:05:
E-mail: neal at ariadne88.freeserve.co.uk
--
Dear Victoria,
Thank you.
Neal.


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Victoria from England wrote on March 27. 2004, 09:54:
E-mail: mail at victoriaseymour.com
--
Hello Neal, I am just researching my way through the Hastings and St Leonards Observer again for my third book about WWII on the local home front; I am at July 1942 at present. If I find a report of Gladys' fatal accident when I look at 1944 I will send you details. Regards, Victoria


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NEAL FOWLER from Scotland wrote on March 27. 2004, 09:32:
E-mail: neal at ariadne88.freeserve.co.uk
--
Was reading the various messages from people from Canada and it reminded me of my Fathers' uncle Bill Field who came from Canada and served in the Hastings Home Guard. His daughter Gladys was killed during the war .She was in the aux. Territorial Service and was fire watching on one of the Hotels, slipped and fell.She was 22 years old. I thought I would look up the war graves commission web site to see if I could find her.Sure enough there she was and strangely enough she died exactly 60 years ago to the day (27th march 1944).I never met her but feel that people like her should not be forgotten.
I do remember her parents Uncle Bill and Auntie Win, she was their only child and greatly missed.


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Gill from England wrote on March 22. 2004, 11:03:
E-mail: oldtrucker42 at membersv21.co.uk
--
Sorry Victoria i have just e-mailed you about our book about the Ore Valley a group of us have been working on. If interested i hope to hear from you soon.


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Victoria from England wrote on March 22. 2004, 08:16: --
Hi Carol, Thanks for your further comments. Others have wondered about how the turkeys kept fresh in transportation.There has been no satisfactory explanation. I can only say that in December Canada was cold, the journey was cold and Britain was cold. We don't get winters like it here anymore. If you take another look at the text you will see that it was I who had the water divining talent-not Emilie. But I bet she could have done it too, if she had only tried! Regards, Victoria


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Carol Brier from USA wrote on March 22. 2004, 07:43:
E-mail: BrierRivendell at aol.com
--
Dear Ms. Seymour:
I am thoroughly enjoying Letters from Lavender Cottage and I feel as though I have become part of the family. It was very sad to lose Edith Lake and her loss was keenly felt by Emilie.
As an animal lover, I have grown very fond of James and Laura. Some of what Laura had to say made me laugh out loud while I was under the dryer at the beauty parlor!
I find it very interesting that what corn they had was boiled to within and inch of its life. The egg-less cake sounded very intriguing although I would imagine that such recipes are available today.
Could you explain to me how the turkeys were shipped to Miss Emilie without spoiling? She metions that two of them were taken to the butcher for storage in his frige so they were fresh turkeys.
I was astounded by the story of the divining rod. I had always thought this was a charlatan's trick, but obviously not. Miss Emilie seemed to have quite a talent for it.
What has struck me, is the sharing of food with others less fortunate. It is so heartening. In "Foyle's War" we often see just the opposite happening and how uplifting it is to know that there were truly selfless people who followed the "Golden Rule". Miss Emilie was an amazing person and I have grown very fond of her.
Sincerely,
Carol


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Carol Brier from USA wrote on March 15. 2004, 13:05:
E-mail: BrierRivendell at aol.com
--
Dear Ms. Seymour:
I have just begun to read "Letters from Lavendar Cottage" and I find it very interesting reading, to say the least. Suddenly, I found myself making notes in the margins about topics I would like to discuss with you. I hope you don't mind a running commentary rather than some thoughts upon completion of the book.
I became aware of your books through the Michael Kitchen site. Mr. Kitchen has been a favorite actor of mine for some time and I think that Foyle's War is one of his best efforts yet.
My experience with WW2 is second-hand. I am a war baby, having been born in 1944. Ny parents were that confident of an Allied victory, they decided to add to the family. I recall my mother talking about rationing during the war and how she had virtually no photographs of me because film was almost impossible to get during the war and immediately after. My father was too old for WW2 and he was considered to be in an essential job - he was an engineer with the Consolidated Edison Company - the largest utility in New York City where I was born and raised.
The other contact with the war is a neighbor of mine who was stationed in England during the war with the US 8th Air Force. He flew 30 missions over Germany and caught some flak on the last flight. Everyone had to bail out but made it back safely. He does not care much for fireworks, since they remind him of the flak and gunfire during those missions.
The letters paint a very stark picture indeed of rationing and a determination to contribute to the war effort. Emilie talks about the vegetable gardens as being a source of food. I remember my mother talking, almost boasting, about her Victory Garden and how she shared with some of the neighbors - she had quite a green thumb.
The potato cakes, or "tryits", was very interesting. Being of German descent, potato pancakes have been a staple at the dinner table, but something very different apparently in England during WW2. I often pride myself and indulging my dinner guests with making one of my special dishes - tomato pie. How very different it all was during the war.
I remember an episode from the tv series "Upstairs Downstairs" when the cook, Mrs Bridges, and her assistant, Ruby, go to a lecture about cooking with leftovers and scraps of food during WW1 and how pleased she was at the end of the day to serve "Win the War Pie" to the chagrin of the staff for dinner that evening. It was indeed something very serious at the time.
Please do not misunderstand me. I have known nothing but prosperity all my life, and I am trying to imagine what it must have been like during the war. The letters are making all of the hardships endured by so many people at that time and their dedication to the war effort more of a reality for me. I remember Miss Emilie disparaging about knitting and trying so many things to aid in the war effort. During the Gulf War I wrote letters to soldiers and baked cookies for the troops. Everyone wanted to tie a yellow ribbon around a tree to show support for the troops. The only shortage was a shortage of yellow ribbon. I remember radio announcers giving the location of shops in Westchester County, where I now live, that had a supply of yellow ribbon. Vastly different from WW2.
My goodness, I did not mean to ramble on like this, but the book has made quite an impression with me already.
Thank you so much for your efforts and I hope to chat with you again.
Sincerely,
Carol Brier
P.S. I did leave a message for you on the Michael Kitchen site (I'm Caroleeee).


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Claudine Dayton from USA wrote on February 22. 2004, 14:23:
E-mail: jillandjudy at comcast.net
--
What an interesting site! As a dedicated Anglophile I have bookmarked this site for future visits. My husband and I spent October and one week in November in England. It was my sixth visit and his second. We are growing older and travel from the west coast of the USA is getting more difficult but we ADORE your country. Have never visited Hastings but you have made me put it at the top of my list if we ever get over again. Thank you,
Claudine Dayton
Lebanon, Oregon USA


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Ksenya Bannykh from Russia wrote on February 13. 2004, 09:13:
E-mail: nesya-k at mail.ru
--
Hi!
I'm not from Hastings, I'm Russian. And I'm also very interested in WWII, becuase in every Russian family someone was killed in this war or wounded. The reason for writing you this letter: I heard that each country which participated in this war consider itself to be the only winner. Is it true and do really Englishmen think that they brought peace to the whole world?
P.S. If I made some mistakes, I beg you pardon!


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julie humphris from Australia wrote on February 7. 2004, 17:20:
E-mail: jhump at ozemail.com.au
--
For many years, I have corresponded with Eleanor, Wendy Johnson's Mother, as I have an interest in a descendant of their King family who came to South Australia c1869.
I'd like to buy your books, when I can work out how to do it from here, I'm not very confident about buying things per internet.
I enjoyed your life story, best wishes.


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Nis from United Kingdom wrote on January 3. 2004, 10:07:
E-mail: sartorck at hotmail.com
--

HAPPY NEW YEAR TO VICTORIA AND AN EVEN MORE SUCCESSFUL 2004


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Lindsay Powell from New Zealand wrote on December 26. 2003, 16:02:
E-mail: lindsay at orcon.net.nz
--
Hi Victoria
I have just read Letters from Lavender Cottage, a Christmas present from a friend in Hastings who thought as a former Hastonian I would find it interesting to find out how life was during that period. Didn't I just,thank you.
A splendid read, it was a pity I had to turn out the light & go to sleep! As I couldn't think of the whereabouts of Lavender Cottage I just had to read on this morning to see if there were any clues (luckily there were!)didn't I?
I can relate to the cold winters on The Ridge, I remember December 1970, a ten minute drive along a snow covered Ridge to the the Cemetery and not being able to get out of the car because the locks were frozen solid.
Your web site is very interesting,I will be visiting it often.
Best Wishes for 2004
Lindsay
27.12.2003 13:00


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Lindsay Powell from New Zealand signed the guestbook on December 26. 2003, 15:37. E-mail: lindsay at orcon.net.nz


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Marc Ricketts from United Kingdom wrote on December 26. 2003, 02:06:
E-mail: Rickettsgate at aol.com
--
Hello my Name is Marc. I am 31 years old and i still live with my Mum and Dad. My interests are Football, Walking, Travelling, Bird Watching, Using My Camcorder and listening to Music. Seeks Femall Penpals in and around the Hastings area. Hastings is my Favorit place of all Time. Now if i won the Lottery i would buy a House over there.


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Martin Blackburn from United Kingdom wrote on December 22. 2003, 04:59:
E-mail: martybee2002 at yahoo.com
--

I dearly wish to send a Xmas present and fan letter to Honeysuckle Weeks...is there an address I can post it to ?!!


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Amanda (Amy) from USA wrote on December 18. 2003, 13:30:
E-mail: crazy_chic93 at hotmail.com
URL: http://writing.com
--
Adam's mentioned your books to me. If Colin has a copy of one, i'd like to read it while i'm there.


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Susan Lee from Canada wrote on December 13. 2003, 14:54:
E-mail: lee7 at shaw.ca
--
I am looking for my mothers cousing from St Leonards on Sea. He and my father have corresponded frequently until April of this year. They have tried phoning him and can get no response. I cannot find and local nespaper to check Obituaris and we have no one else to contact. He is a bachelor in His early 80's does travel a fair bit but was ill in his last letter to my father. His name is Gavin McMeekin and lives at flat 4 4 Pevensey rd St leonards on Sea East Sussex. I don't have his phone number myself. I am doing this search on behalf of my parents. We know he has a couple of cousins on his mothers side, but we have no contact for them. I contacted the Hastings Police in mid November via email with basically the same information but have had no respons. Today I also gave this same information to the Salvation Army family tracing service. I would appreciate and information I can to pass on to may parents. He is my mothers only living cousin and they were expecting him to come for a visit this year as he usually comes about every 5 years. We last saw him in the summer of 2001
Thank you.
Susan Lee
Abbotsford BC.


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Kate from United Kingdom wrote on December 12. 2003, 08:58:
E-mail: katiespitfire at hotmail.com
--
What a great website, going to order a copy of 'Letters from Lavender cottage'.
For those bitten by the 1940s bug, there are some fantastic living history events in the UK.
Visit www.cc41.net
Well done Victoria!
Kate
East Yorkshire


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Helle Rex from Denmark wrote on December 9. 2003, 08:08:
E-mail: helle_rex at hotmail.com
--
I've enjoyed the TV-serie.
Regards
Helle Rex


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francis kelly from United Kingdom wrote on November 29. 2003, 01:45:
E-mail: fkelly at aol.com
--
a reference was made in Foyle's war to looting and the penalties thereof.
did anyone in fact suffer execution for looting or even life imprisonment
and if so were lifers released after the war?
thank you


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Freda Brown from United Kingdom wrote on November 16. 2003, 04:37:
E-mail: frdbrow7 at aol.com
URL: http://www.reminiscethis.co.uk
--
Now there's an interesting idea - suggestions for who should play who - I shall volunteer the cat on Coronation Street to play James, as he's a tabby and obviously has a green card! ;-) On the other hand, my very handsome black cat Merlin, is looking for a bit of stardom......


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stephanie from Europe wrote on November 13. 2003, 08:38:
E-mail: steph4tezza at hotmail.com
--
i have lives throw the war i seen people die we were poor we didnt go to schooli hade no money we only got our breakfast and lunch we could not get a snack in between


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Wendy Johnson from Canada wrote on November 2. 2003, 14:30:
E-mail: lavendercat_408 at hotmail.com
--
Foyle's War is to be shown on TVOntario beginning November 16. There will be 4 episodes of 2 hours each. That means that those in upper New York state can see it along with all of Ontario.
Freda, I agree! Wouldn't Letters from Lavender Cottage be a wonderful series? I think Victoria already has Judi Dench picked out to play Emilie! Dame Dench doesn't know that yet!
Wendy


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FredaBrown from United Kingdom wrote on November 2. 2003, 10:12:
E-mail: frdbrow7 at aol.com
--
As Foyles War was so well received, one wonders why someone hasn't thought of making 'Letters from Lavender Cottage' into a TV series - it would be lovely to see come to life what we have so far only been able to read and visualise in our own minds. Any TV scouts reading these messages???????


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Wendy Johnson from Canada wrote on October 28. 2003, 12:31:
E-mail: lavendercat_408 at hotmail.com
--
You have another winner, Victoria! Congratulations on Letters to Hannah. I was fascinated by the stories told by those who lived through the war, and also found your autobiography interesting. What a wonderful legacy to leave to Hannah. Thanks for continuing the war time theme started in Letters From Lavender Cottage.
Wendy


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Victoria Seymour from England wrote on October 23. 2003, 05:26:
E-mail: mail at victoriaseymour.com
--
FOR ALL FANS. THE SECOND SERIES OF FOYLE'S WAR STARTS ON ITV, ON SUNDAY 16TH NOVEMBER 2003


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Diane Mason from USA wrote on August 31. 2003, 16:40:
E-mail: dianemandm2002 at yahoo.com
--
Letters from Lavender Cottage is a delightful book. Thanks for putting it together and thanks to Wendy Johnson for the letters. Your comments add immensely to the information the letters contain. I am looking forward to your new title and eagerly await its publication. Could you please answer one question? How did they send turkeys from Canada to England without spoilage as well as butter and cheese? I never knew bacon was in a tin until this book.
Thank you,
Diane Mason


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Victoria Seymour from England wrote on August 2. 2003, 15:36:
E-mail: mail at victoriaseymour.com
--
Foyle's War returns to Hastings-Hastings Council Press Release.
The production company behind the BAFTA award winning ITV drama Foyle's War will be back in Hastings filming for a second series on the weekend 3-4 August.
The series, which was heralded as a replacement for Morse, was a hit, pulling in almost 8.5 million viewers per episode and nearly 60 million viewers worldwide.
There will be some traffic disruption in Croft Road and Hill Street on Friday August 1 from midday onwards and all day on Saturday August 2. Owing to the size of the fleet of production vehicles, most of the Bourne and a significant portion of the beach car parks will be unavailable for both days.
Foyles War boosted the profile of the town both nationally and internationally and the second series, which promises more action and mystery, is all set to do the same when it is aired in November.


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Carole Edmunds from Africa wrote on August 2. 2003, 13:48:
E-mail: carjohn at xsinet.co.za
--
An interested party from South Africa, with family links to St Leonard's. Thank you for this website!


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Victoria Seymour. from England wrote on July 17. 2003, 11:06:
E-mail: mail at victoriaseymour.com

--
Foyles War fans, among whom I include myself, will be delighted to hear that there are plans to start filming another series in Hastings, in October 2003. As soon as I have dates and details I will post another message.


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Freda Brown from United Kingdom wrote on July 5. 2003, 20:06:
E-mail: frdbrow7 at aol.com
URL: http://reminiscethis.co.uk
--
Hello Victoria, your wonderful book has had me looking around for others on the war years, and I have come up with a local author(Huntingdon), Dora Tack, who has written two books - 'From Bombs To Buckets' which details with humour, the very hard life country folk had without electricity, running water or inside loos! as well as coping with the fear of bombing raids. The other one is - 'Whispering Elms'which I shall be reading next - to keep me going until your next book comes out, Victoria!! I'm sure others who enjoy or would like to learn about this era, will enjoy reading them.
regards
Freda


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Kayley G from United Kingdom wrote on June 30. 2003, 12:25:
E-mail: xander_harris_rulz at hotmail.com
--
Its a cool website for school!


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KRISTY from United Kingdom wrote on June 24. 2003, 19:06:
E-mail: kristywythe10 at hotmail.com
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hi just wondered did you get on with the peple you stayed with as an evacuee did they beat you or trae you well please email me!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!


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Victoria Seymour from England wrote on June 21. 2003, 19:39:
E-mail: mail at victoriaseymour.com

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Dear Mary,
The companion book to Letters From Lavender Cottage, Letters to Hannah,
will be published in October. It covers Hastings in more detail on the Home
Front, between September 1939 to December 1945. Running alongside the social
history is my childhood biography, as before. Two of Emilie's letters are
reprised and there is snippet about her and Edith that came to light after
LFLC was published. It will be advertised on my web site soon.
I am so glad you fell in love with Emilie, so did I!
Kind regards, Victoria Seymour


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Mary from Canada wrote on June 21. 2003, 16:20: --
I have just finished reading Letters and found it a fascinating read. That dear lady was such a character. I really wish there was more information regarding immediate family, how she grew up, marital status, education, interests, how she came to live with "Clar'Em'ly" and Edith Lake and dear old James. There is so much I want to learn about her after catching a glimpse of her unfortunate last years. Though I suppose she would say it wasn't so bad. Thank you for the book. I'm waiting for my mom to read it so she can tell me what she remembers about her years in England and here in Canada in the '40s and '50s.


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Nikki from United Kingdom wrote on June 16. 2003, 10:44:
E-mail: Bringiton at aol.com
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hi i am doin a projest on ww2 i wuld like it if u could give me some information thank you


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Dinah Stuart from Scotland wrote on June 6. 2003, 21:19:
E-mail: dinahs at onetel.com
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Hi there
I would like to contact Michael Boleyn who was the construction manager on Foley's War. If you have an email address for Mick could you send him my address as I would dearly like to contact him
Many thanks................Dinah Stuart.


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Freda from United Kingdom wrote on June 5. 2003, 20:10:
E-mail: frdbrow7 at aol.com
URL: http://reminiscethis.co.uk
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Hello Victoria, I'm rather sorry that I have now finished reading 'Letters from Lavendar Cottage' as it has been a joy getting to know the three elderly ladies and James the cat. It really is a wonderful book and anyone who hasn't yet read it - is in for a wonderful treat. I look forward to your next book.
regards
Freda


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michelle beatem from England wrote on June 3. 2003, 10:14:
E-mail: babe111141 at hotmail.com
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great site! excellent quality really helped me with my history project!


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Julie Backshall from England wrote on June 3. 2003, 09:00:
E-mail: julie.backshall at kingsbridge.co.uk
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dear Victoria, I wanted to let you know how much I enjoyed Letters from Lavender Cottage, and hope you will not abandon your book writing there.
What a coincidence that you were contacted by Wendy Johnson. And how wonderful that you were able to do something with the letters.
My own family came from Hastings, although not The Ridge unfortunately!, and lived there during the years you mention. In fact, I still have family there today. My dad was raised in Hastings and was there through some of the war years, and his aunt remained there. The photo of Emilie in her slippers reminded me so much of my aunt who wore identical slippers!!
Your book, therefore, was all the more special as it described the times in which my relatives lived, but, that aside, made fascinating reading.
I started my family tree 2 years ago, which necessitated a visit to Hastings and has made me very interested in the history of Hastings - I won't tell you more or you'll be using it as the material for your next book!!
Many congratulations on your success: please let me know if you write anything else.
JULIE BACKSHALL


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Freda Brown from United Kingdom wrote on May 28. 2003, 22:24:
E-mail: frdbrow7 at aol.com
URL: http://reminiscethis.co.uk
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Hello Victoria, just wanted to say that I recieved your book today - that was quick work!! All I need now are a few quiet moments to enjoy - so looking forward to reading it.
regards
Freda


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Montague Hamilton Chapin from USA wrote on May 27. 2003, 03:26:
E-mail: cynthiachapin at hotmail.com
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I was born in Bournemouth in 1932. I have vivid memories of the war years & the bombing of London & the rationing, I and my brother & sister were finally evacuated to Rhyl in north wales in 1941. I & my brother & sister were among the lucky ones as my father was an American citizen & had many relatives in the United States, as a result we sailed on the Queen Elizabeth, November 1942 to Halifax, Nova Scotia in Canada finally going to New York & not returning to England until September 1945. I remember there were many German prisoners of war on the ship & some spoke english & I remember how nice they were.
Your website brought back many memories & many were not that bad.


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Freda Brown from United Kingdom wrote on May 25. 2003, 21:05:
E-mail: frdbrow7 at aol.com
URL: http://www.reminiscethis.co.uk
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So glad I came to this site after reading about your book 'Letters from Lavender Cottage' (lovely title!) in 'Yours' magazine. I adore Sussex - Rye is my most favourite place on earth - and Hastings with it's wonderful history. I shall return often to investigate all the links. I also look forward to reading you book. Perhaps (with your permission) readers might like to visit my site and read mine?
Best Regards
Freda


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Madison from USA wrote on May 15. 2003, 22:45:
E-mail: SwimnMad at aol.com
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Great site just need some pictures.


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Y.M.K.Jackman Mrs. from England wrote on May 6. 2003, 11:39:
E-mail: yvonnejackman at realemail.co
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Reading about your book in the 'Yours' magazine, I found it very interesting. My family and I settled in St.Leonards in 1965 because my husband, a Civil Sevant,was posted there, to help set up the first computer center.
One of our daughters got married there and the reception was held at the Boughpark Hotel Battle,(don't know if I spelled the name right). She was connected to their riding stables and the rest of the girls formed a guard of Honour with their ponies. It was wonderful, and a total surprise to us. It was also covered by the local press.
Hasting, Battle and St Leonards will always hold happy memories for us and I look forward to purchasing your book
Kind regards
Yvonne Jackman/


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Judy Harris from USA wrote on April 10. 2003, 13:20:
E-mail: songryter at msn.com
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Hi Ms.Seymour. I was surfing the net alittle this morning for things about Hastings, England since this is the birthplace of my great grandmother....last name Morley. Your book looks quite interesting. At a later time, I wish to purchase a copy. For now, I have you under my favorites. Nice to see you here. Have an excellent day. Judy Conroe Harris...Syracuse, NY


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Valerie Jean Lonneville from England wrote on March 30. 2003, 03:05:
E-mail: cruise-addicts at nc.rr.com
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Thank you for your very gracious reply to my request today.
I was born in Bristol, England exactly one year after rationing started. Jan 8th 1941.
I have some very vivid memories of the war and the hard times through the early 50's some of the things I posted about today were quite an eye opener to some of the posters on our board.
Germans were interred right behind my Grandmothers house, I would go up to the fence and talk to them.
I have enjoyed reading through your site. You have lived an interesting life. But you made it that way yourself.
I wish that I had met you.
regards, Valerie


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Francisca Anaradoh from England wrote on March 26. 2003, 21:36:
E-mail: francisca at anaradoh.fslife.co.uk
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I just wanted to make contact to say that i am currently reading letters from lavender cottage.I find it rather a hauntingly beautiful book and i am really enjoying it.I also wanted to say that it is a joy to read that someone else feels the same way about Hastings that i do.I moved down from London 7 months ago to St. Leonards and I am currently hoping to move to Ore.Hastings has been everything i hoped for and more and i am really happy here!Keep up the good work!Fran.


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tina fulcher from England wrote on March 24. 2003, 21:52: --
l am very proud to tell you that my daughter has writen a peice all about you in her story in the hastings news


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frank strudwick from United Kingdom wrote on March 24. 2003, 16:50:
E-mail: frank at strudwick38.co.uk
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Excerpts from Lavender cottage brought back memories of food parcels received from the U.S. and the day our house was bombed. It all seems so unreal now as though it had happened to someone else.
Keep up the good work


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Johanna Taylor from England wrote on March 4. 2003, 21:08:
E-mail: neil.taylor at tinyworld.co.uk
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I've loved, and enjoyed reading, the book I purchased in Hastings Museum. I plan to visit Hastings soon to view some of the locations mentioned in your book.


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Vincent Nelson from USA wrote on March 4. 2003, 08:36:
E-mail: ANelson786 at aol.com
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Just a line to let you know, my wife and I enjoyed the series of Foyle's War very much. And the scenery was very good. All of it was very good. We hope more in the series will be coming. Thank you.


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V, Ronsick from USA wrote on February 27. 2003, 12:51:
E-mail: alvaron4u at hotmail.com
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Loved the Masterpiece Theatre presentation. Good character development. Wonderful view of the era. Author did a wonderful job.


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Mrs. Dorothy Dowding from Canada wrote on February 26. 2003, 21:16:
E-mail: bobdord at sympatico.ca
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I was Wendy Johnson's Grade 7 teacher and we correspond frequently. She was so excited about your book. I intend to read it since my mother-in-law was a WWI war bride from Eastbourne and we heard much about Hastings and area. Her father owned a hotel on the coast near Beachy Head which the German aircraft used as a navigational aid. The hotel had to be closed of course, during the war. The ties are still strong between Canada and Britain.


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Barbara Glass from USA wrote on February 25. 2003, 00:02:
E-mail: dowchee1 at viclink.com
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Great story!


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Virginia L. Harris from USA wrote on February 17. 2003, 23:23:
E-mail: vlharris50 at mindspring.com
URL: http://start.earthlink.net/
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I have enjoyed watching Foyle's War on American PBS. I always enjoy the scenery and of course the story line is wonderful. It has also been a learning experience-I had no idea that Germans were interred during WWII. No doubt that many Americans will be interested in visiting this part of England after watching this series. I hope I will have the time to do some reading about this area, including Letters from Lavender Cottage.


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sally brown from USA wrote on February 11. 2003, 15:35:
E-mail: sbrown at wvu.edu
--
I was born at the beginning of WII and grew up up with its cultural/social heriage. Now that it apears we will be going to war because of George W's policies, I need to read about war on this very personal and basic level. I have a question: after reading the excerpt with the letter proper, and the editoral letter in italics after it:is this the format of the book? This commentary in the form of a letter along with the photograph(s) is very important to me. The explanations are what I'm looking for; it will make me buy the book.
Do you have an US distribtor? Can you send me a copy? Or should I write my friends in Greenwich and London to sen d me one?
Thanks.
Sally Brown
Morgantown, USA


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Margaret Wilson from Australia wrote on February 7. 2003, 06:53:
E-mail: rmwilson2 at optusnet.com.au
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Dear Victoria,
I was born & raised in Hastings from 1941 to 1958.My mother & father lived in Dukes road, Silverhill & then moved to Battle road where I was raised with a brother & two sisters.My father served during the war & I believe he was on one of the small boats that went to France for the D- Day landing.He also served in Germany & India.I went to Silverhill Primary school& Miss Willoughby was the teacher.A house was bombed just up the road from us & we had all of our windows shattered,then boarded up.
I clearly remember the food rationing & coupons to purchase butter & sugar.I still remember going down to our local sweet shop for a penny,s worth of sweets, only to find the shop was completely empty & the owner saying "if you can find a sweet in the shop I will give it to you"
Hope Foyles War comes on the television here in Australia.
My mother is 85 yrs old & in a nursing home here in Aussie so I will talk to her about your book etc: as she likes to talk about her time during the war.
This brought back a lot of memories, thank you.


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Fiona from Australia wrote on December 4. 2002, 12:19:
E-mail: florrie59 at yahoo.com
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Charming and very informative site/s, Mrs Seymour. I found it while looking for information on "Foyle's War" and I have had a lovely time reading up on Hastings - particularly the history and Old Town.
Thank you, I've added Hastings to my "places to visit one day" list :)


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Peter from United Kingdom wrote on November 30. 2002, 18:24: --
This may be over kill but another message wishing you a happy birthday


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Shirley Brouwer from Canada wrote on November 22. 2002, 03:11:
E-mail: juragirl at xcelco.on.ca
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Just listened to the interview of yourself and Wendy. As a life long friend of Wendy, and also her mother it was a thrill to hear. Best wishes with the book it sounds like a gem.


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Susan Playdon from England wrote on November 20. 2002, 14:20:
E-mail: Susanplaydon at aol.com
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You may be interested to know that Hammicks Bookshop in Horsham West Sussex have had a few requests (including mine) for your book, but were unable to help, they tried their wholesalers and Southern Counties radio. Thank goodness I have found you, am buying the book for my mother's birthday, I'm sure she will love it.


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Colin Boylett from England wrote on November 12. 2002, 21:58:
E-mail: colin at etchinghamsussex.co.uk
URL: http://www.etchinghamsussex.co.uk
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Heard the details of your book on the radio earlier today, sounds fascinating, order form in the post.
hastings.uk.net an interesting site, will be adding a link on the Etchingham site next time I update.
Keep up the good work.
Colin Boylett.


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Wendy Johnson from Canada wrote on November 5. 2002, 00:33:
E-mail: wendyejohnson at yahoo.com
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Walter and I will be in Hastings next week, Victoria, and we are so looking forward to it. I am very excited about actually holding a copy of Letters from Lavender Cottage in my hands! See you soon! Wendy


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Arlene Long from Canada wrote on November 1. 2002, 13:27:
E-mail: mandalong at netzero.net
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Hello Victoria, I am a good friend of Wendy J's - and am so excited for you both. It will be an exciting book, filled with touching memories.I started to write to a pen pal friend in London in 1943 and we are still corresponding and sharing our life experiences. Through letters, we have become best friends. In 2000, I travelled to London and finally met her and her family. What a thrilling time!!Good luck with your book - and am looking forward to hearing all about it from Wendy on her return. Best regards, Arlene


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Glory Denyer from Canada wrote on October 31. 2002, 20:26:
E-mail: gdenyer at sympatico.ca
--

Great idea Victoria. Glory